ADSORPTION ON ALUMINA OF DIFFERENT ORIGIN

Authors

  • Branko Škundrić Academy of Science and Arts of the Republic of Srpska, Bana Lazarevića 1, Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska
  • Dragica Lazić University in Istočno Sarajevo, Faculty of Technology, Karakaj bb, Zvornik, Republic of Srpska
  • Sanja Dobrnjac “Projekt“ a.d., Veselina Masleše IV/1, Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska
  • Rada Petrović University in Banja Luka, Faculty of Technology, Vojvode Stepe Stepanovića 73, Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska
  • Jelena Penavin Škundrić University in Banja Luka, Faculty of Technology, Vojvode Stepe Stepanovića 73, Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska
  • Zorica Levi University in Banja Luka, Faculty of Technology, Vojvode Stepe Stepanovića 73, Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska
  • Gordana Ostojić Alumina d.o.o., Karakaj bb, Zvornik, Republic of Srpska

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.7251/cm.v2i7.4234

Abstract

The adsorbent used in the study was the alumina obtained from the bauxite found in the locality of Milici, Siroki Brijeg and alumina synthesized in the laboratory and obtained by sedimentation from the solution of aluminium nitrate and concentrated ammonia along with controlling pH solution in the course of sedimentation. The obtained sediment of alumina was annealed for 4 hours at 273 K. The adsorbates were triphenylmethane dyes, carboxylic acids – acetic and lauric one and aqueous solution of ammonia. Alumina was modified by the surface active agents (SAA), cation-active SAA, triethanolamine-di-estermethylsulfate called Propagen, and anion-active SAA, Na-salt alkyldiglycoethersulfate called Genapol. The textural characteristics of adsorbents were determined by the adsorption of nitrogen from the gas phase at the temperature of liquid nitrogen, and the results of the adsorption of acid and base adsorbates gave an insight in the changes, i.e. characteristics of surface active centers on which the adsorption takes place

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Published

2017-12-29